Florida Fishing Report: Red Tide Status, 3-23-18

Florida Red Tide Status Map, 3-23-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.
Florida Red Tide Status Map, 3-23-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.

Florida Fish & Wildlife Red Tide Status: Friday, March 23, 2018

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Direct From Homeowners.FWC released the Red Tide Status Report this week.

Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission red tide bulletin at 2:32 PM 3/23/2018.

Red Tide Status Report (March 23, 2018)

“A bloom of the Florida red tide organism, Karenia brevis, persists in Southwest Florida.

In Southwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at low concentrations in two samples collected from or offshore of Charlotte County, very low to high concentrations in 29 samples collected from or offshore of Lee County, very low to medium concentrations in 14 samples collected from or offshore of Collier County, and low to medium concentrations in three samples collected offshore of Monroe County.

Gulf of Mexico Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin Friday, March 23, 2018. Courtesy Of NOAA National Ocean Service NOAA Satellite and Information Service & NOAA National Weather Service.
Gulf of Mexico Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin
Friday, March 23, 2018. Courtesy Of NOAA National Ocean Service NOAA Satellite and Information Service & NOAA National Weather Service.

In Northwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at background concentrations in two samples collected from Bay County.

Additional samples collected throughout Florida over the past week did not contain K. brevis.

Over the past week, fish kills were reported in the following Southwest Florida counties: Sarasota (3/18, 3/20 at Venice Beach), Lee (3/21 – 3/22 at Bonita Beach, 3/16 and 3/19 – 3/22 at Gasparilla Island), and Collier (3/20 – 3/22 at Barefoot Beach, 3/16 in Blind Pass, 3/20 in the Collier Bay Canal, 3/16 and 3/20 – 3/22 at Marco Island, 3/23 at Naples Beach, 3/21 – 3/22 at Vanderbilt Beach). Respiratory irritation was reported over the past week in Sarasota (3/16 – 3/17 and 3/20 at Manasota Beach, 3/16 – 3/19 at Venice Beach, 3/20 at Venice North Jetty), Lee (3/21-3/22 at Bonita Beach, 3/19 at Causeway Islands, 3/16 and 3/19 – 3/22 at Gasparilla Island Range Lighthouse), and Collier (3/21 – 3/22 at Barefoot, South Marco, and Vanderbilt beaches, and 3/21 at Seagate Beach) counties.

Forecasts by the USF-FWC Collaboration for Prediction of Red TidesExternal Website for Pinellas to northern Monroe counties predict net southern transport of surface waters and southern, onshore transport of subsurface waters over the next three days.”

For more information, please see FWC.

Key for Results

Description Karenia breviscells/liter Possible Effects (K. brevis only)
NOT PRESENT – BACKGROUND background levels of 1,000 cells or less None anticipated
VERY LOW >1,000 to 10,000 Possible respiratory irritation; shellfish harvesting closures >  5,000 cells/L
LOW >10,000 to 100,000 Respiratory irritation, possible fish kills, and bloom chlorophyll probably detected by satellites at upper limits
MEDIUM >100,000 to 1,000,000 Respiratory irritation and probable fish kills
HIGH >1,000,000 As above plus discoloration

 

“The FWRI Red Tide Status Line is now available to callers throughout the state. FWRI updates the recording each Friday by 5 p.m. Red Tide Status Line: 866-300-9399 (toll-free inside Florida only); 727-552-2448 (outside Florida).

Reports are updated on Friday afternoon except during holidays, in which case the report will be released on the closest day. Additional information, if available, is provided on Wednesday afternoon. To receive an e-mail when the current status has been updated, visit our subscription area.

FWC’s Red Tide Action Report

Red tide is a naturally-occurring microscopic alga that has been documented along Florida’s Gulf Coast since the 1840’s and occurs nearly every year. Blooms, or higher-than-normal concentrations, of the Florida red tide alga, Karenia brevis, frequently occur in the Gulf of Mexico. Red tide begins in the Gulf of Mexico 10 to 40 miles offshore and can be transported inshore by winds and currents.

FWC Actions and Partnerships:

  • FWC operates the toll-free fish kill hotline. To report fish kills, contact the FWC Fish Kill Hotline at 800-636-0511 or submit a report online. Reports from this hotline help FWC researchers track and better understand the impact of red tide in Florida.
  • FWC remains available to local agencies and partners in affected areas, including area business and tourism groups in southwest Florida. Any local agency or group that has any questions or concerns can contact Kelly Richmond from the FWC at 727-502-4784.
  • FWC continues to partner with the Florida Department of Health to advise residents and visitors of any potential health impacts. Residents and visitors can contact the DOH’s aquatic toxin experts at 850-245-4250 or contact their local health department for any concern about health safety.
  • FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and Mote Marine Laboratory work together to monitor Karenia brevis. This cooperative effort is designed to help mitigate the adverse impacts of red tide. This joint research program that includes red tide monitoring, research and public outreach and education has resulted in better tools and ongoing monitoring for red tides along the Gulf Coast.
  • In partnership with the FWC, the Collaboration for Prediction of Red Tides (CPR) at the University of South Florida offer a new Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) tracking tool that generates a 3.5-day forecast of the bloom trajectories.
  • To protect public health, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute’s Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) group closely monitors the status of K. brevis on Florida’s coasts, providing technical support to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACSExternal Website), the agency that regulates approved shellfish harvesting areas.
  • Since 2000, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute established a Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program, which is a volunteer program for citizens to help collect water samples from routine collection points and sites reported for suspected harmful algal blooms (HABs).The timely sampling by volunteers allows researchers to provide an early warning of offshore algal blooms and investigate reported events as they occur. The Program needs volunteers to collect samples from all coastal Florida counties. To view more information visit, Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program or use the Volunteer SignUp Form.

Red Tide Resources

Florida Fishing Report: Red Tide Status, 3-2-18

Florida Red Tide Status Map, 3-2-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.
Florida Red Tide Status Map, 3-2-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.

Florida Fish & Wildlife Red Tide Status: Friday, March 2, 2018

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Direct From Homeowners.FWC released the Red Tide Status Report this week.

Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission red tide bulletin at 2:47 PM 3/2/2018.

Red Tide Status Report (March 2, 2018)

“A patchy bloom of the Florida red tide organism, Karenia brevis, persists in Southwest Florida.

In Southwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at background concentrations in one sample collected from Pinellas County, background concentrations in one sample collected offshore of Hillsborough County, background to medium concentrations in eleven samples collected from Sarasota County, background to low concentrations in six samples collected from Charlotte County, background to medium concentrations in fifteen samples collected from Lee County, and background to very low concentrations in three samples collected from Collier County.

Gulf of Mexico Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin Friday, March 2, 2018.  Courtesy Of NOAA National Ocean Service NOAA Satellite and Information Service & NOAA National Weather Service.
Gulf of Mexico Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin
Friday, March 2, 2018. Courtesy Of NOAA National Ocean Service NOAA Satellite and Information Service & NOAA National Weather Service.

Additional samples collected throughout Florida over the past week did not contain K. brevis.

Numerous fish kill reports were received for Lee and Collier counties over the past week. Areas impacted in Lee County include Big Carlos Pass, Big Hickory Island, Bonita Beach, Captiva Island, Carlos Point, Cayo Costa, Estero Island, Fort Myers Beach, Little Hickory Island, Lovers Key State Park, Pine Island Sound, San Carlos Bay, Sanibel, and offshore of St. James City.

Areas impacted in Collier County include Barefoot Beach, Delnor-Wiggins Park, Vanderbilt Beach, and Wiggins Pass.

Respiratory irritation was reported in Sarasota County at Manasota (3/1), Nokomis (3/1 – 3/2), Venice (3/2), and Venice North Jetty (2/28 – 3/2) beaches; in Lee County at Bonita (3/2), Bowman’s (2/25), Captiva (2/28, 3/2), Causeway Islands (2/26), Gasparilla Island State Park South Lighthouse (3/2), Lovers Key State Park (2/26 – 2/27, 3/2), and Lynn Hall (2/26) beaches; and in Collier County at Barefoot (2/27, 3/1, 3/2) and Delnor-Wiggins State Park (3/1, 3/2) beaches.

Forecasts by the USF-FWC Collaboration for Prediction of Red TidesExternal Website for Pinellas to Monroe counties predict southern, offshore transport of surface waters and southern, onshore transport of subsurface waters over the next three days.”

For more information, please see FWC.

Key for Results

Description Karenia breviscells/liter Possible Effects (K. brevis only)
NOT PRESENT – BACKGROUND background levels of 1,000 cells or less None anticipated
VERY LOW >1,000 to 10,000 Possible respiratory irritation; shellfish harvesting closures >  5,000 cells/L
LOW >10,000 to 100,000 Respiratory irritation, possible fish kills, and bloom chlorophyll probably detected by satellites at upper limits
MEDIUM >100,000 to 1,000,000 Respiratory irritation and probable fish kills
HIGH >1,000,000 As above plus discoloration

 

“The FWRI Red Tide Status Line is now available to callers throughout the state. FWRI updates the recording each Friday by 5 p.m. Red Tide Status Line: 866-300-9399 (toll-free inside Florida only); 727-552-2448 (outside Florida).

Reports are updated on Friday afternoon except during holidays, in which case the report will be released on the closest day. Additional information, if available, is provided on Wednesday afternoon. To receive an e-mail when the current status has been updated, visit our subscription area.

FWC’s Red Tide Action Report

Red tide is a naturally-occurring microscopic alga that has been documented along Florida’s Gulf Coast since the 1840’s and occurs nearly every year. Blooms, or higher-than-normal concentrations, of the Florida red tide alga, Karenia brevis, frequently occur in the Gulf of Mexico. Red tide begins in the Gulf of Mexico 10 to 40 miles offshore and can be transported inshore by winds and currents.

FWC Actions and Partnerships:

  • FWC operates the toll-free fish kill hotline. To report fish kills, contact the FWC Fish Kill Hotline at 800-636-0511 or submit a report online. Reports from this hotline help FWC researchers track and better understand the impact of red tide in Florida.
  • FWC remains available to local agencies and partners in affected areas, including area business and tourism groups in southwest Florida. Any local agency or group that has any questions or concerns can contact Kelly Richmond from the FWC at 727-502-4784.
  • FWC continues to partner with the Florida Department of Health to advise residents and visitors of any potential health impacts. Residents and visitors can contact the DOH’s aquatic toxin experts at 850-245-4250 or contact their local health department for any concern about health safety.
  • FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and Mote Marine Laboratory work together to monitor Karenia brevis. This cooperative effort is designed to help mitigate the adverse impacts of red tide. This joint research program that includes red tide monitoring, research and public outreach and education has resulted in better tools and ongoing monitoring for red tides along the Gulf Coast.
  • In partnership with the FWC, the Collaboration for Prediction of Red Tides (CPR) at the University of South Florida offer a new Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) tracking tool that generates a 3.5-day forecast of the bloom trajectories.
  • To protect public health, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute’s Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) group closely monitors the status of K. brevis on Florida’s coasts, providing technical support to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACSExternal Website), the agency that regulates approved shellfish harvesting areas.
  • Since 2000, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute established a Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program, which is a volunteer program for citizens to help collect water samples from routine collection points and sites reported for suspected harmful algal blooms (HABs).The timely sampling by volunteers allows researchers to provide an early warning of offshore algal blooms and investigate reported events as they occur. The Program needs volunteers to collect samples from all coastal Florida counties. To view more information visit, Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program or use the Volunteer SignUp Form.

Red Tide Resources

Naples Fishing: Redfish!

Redfish, Sunday, March 4, 2018, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Redfish, Sunday, March 4, 2018, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Naples Fishing Report: Redfish.

VacationHomeRental.org. No VRBO Booking Fees. Free To Renters. $99 Annually To HomeOwners.Naples Fishing Report, Sunday, March 4, 2018, Florida Fishing Report – Naples: Redfish, On The Oyster Bars!  Latest Algal Bloom & Water Quality / Lake Okeechobee Update and Red Tide Report.  We’re mostly focused on Naples fishing the channels, grass flats, passes, oyster bars, mangroves and near shore fishing in Naples, but we also give updates on Naples deep sea fishing.

We’re big advocates of catch and release, particularly for snook, but pretty much for most species.  Only take what you are going to eat, and a lot of fish are better off as sport fish, even if they are in season.  Our motto is let ‘em get bigger and catch ‘em again!

Please see our SanibelCaptivaFort MyersSeashell & Shelling and Cuban Fishing sites for charter photos from our other captains, additional fishing and shelling reports, and musings on fishing in Cuba one of these days!

Big Redfish, Catch & Release, Thursday, May 4, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Big Redfish, Catch & Release, Thursday, May 4, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Please try our pilot Sanibel & Captiva News site or Sanibel & Captiva Events Calendar to see what else is happening Sanibel & Captiva islands!

We’re just getting started in Naples, but we’re looking forward to reporting on Naples fishing!

Naples Fishing Report, Friday, March 2, 2018, Florida Fishing Report – Naples: Redfish, catch & release!  If you are a local Naples fishing guide/captain and would like to submit photos and reports, please let us know.  Daily Naples fishing reports. All are welcome.  You can reach us @ FloridaFishingCharterReport@gmail.com.

Red Drum

Image Credit: © Diane Rome Peebles

“Red Drum: Sciaenops ocellatus
Florida Regulations: (Harvest in federal waters prohibited)
Regulations Northeast Zone Northwest Zone South Zone
Minimum Size Limit Not less than 18″ no more than 27″ total length
Daily Bag Limit 2 fish per person per day; 8 fish vessel limit 1 per person per day; 8 fish vessel limit 1 fish per person per day; 8 fish vessel limit
Remarks Bag limits apply in areas adjacent to fishing sites such as docks and parking lots

6 fish per person transport limit applies when traveling in a vehicle on land away from a fishing site.

Must remain in whole condition until landed ashore

Commercial harvest prohibited

Gear requirements:

  • Legal Gear:  hook and line, cast nets
  • Illegal Gear: Spearing (includes spearfishing, gigging and bowfishing) and/or use of multiple hooks in conjunction with live or dead natural bait is prohibited

Red Drum Management Zones

red drum management zones map

  • Northwest: Escambia through Fred Howard Park Causeway near Pasco County
  • South: Fred Howard Park Causeway through Monroe County (west coast) and Miami-Dade through Volusia counties (east coast)
  • Northeast: Flagler through Nassau counties
Naples Fishing, Redfish, Monday, 3-21-16, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Redfish, Monday, 3-21-16, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

State Waters Harvest Seasons

Habitat and Fishing Tips:

Red drum, also called redfish, channel bass, spottail, red bass or reds, are one of Florida’s most popular sport fish and the state’s most widespread estuarine fish. Red drum are named after the “drumming” sound the make during spawning and when taken out of the water. The sound is produced by muscles rubbing against the inflated air bladder.

Redfish, Sunday, October 15, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Redfish, Sunday, October 15, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Red drum inhabit the nearshore and offshore waters throughout the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic coast from Massachusetts to Key West. Juvenile red drum inhabit rivers, bays, canals, tidal creeks, and passes in estuaries for up to four years, after which they usually move to nearshore or open ocean waters as adults.

Red drum in Florida can reach lengths of 45 inches and weigh up to 51 pounds. The world record red drum was caught off North Carolina waters in 1984 and it weighed 94 pounds, 2 ounces.The oldest recorded red drum in Florida was aged at 40 years.

Redfish, Friday, July 14, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Redfish, Friday, July 14, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Floating a live shrimp under a popping cork is a good way to fish for red drum. They also chase crabs, mullet, pinfish and killifish (mud minnows). Casting soft-bodied jigs, spoons and even top-water plugs will catch the attention of these powerful estuarine musicians. Redfish make great table fare.

State Record: 52 lb 5 oz, caught near Cocoa (1996)

Florida Rules  Also visit: Redfish Catch, Hold and Release Tournament Exemption Permit page

Big Redfish, Catch & Release, Thursday, May 4, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Big Redfish, Catch & Release, Thursday, May 4, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Red Drum Management

Management of red drum in Florida is considered a success story.  In the late 1980s red drum was overfished, thus several emergency closures were established to reduce fishing pressure. In 1989, the slot limit of 18-27 inches, the bag limit of one fish per person and a closed season from March-May were put in place.

Red drum stocks have rebounded and are currently meeting or exceeding the FWC’s management goal of 40% escapement in most parts of Florida. Escapement is the proportion of fish that survive through age four relative to the fish that would have survived if there was no fishery.” Source & more information here.

Tampa Fishing, Friday, December 9, 2016, Redfish, Tampa Fishing Report & Charters.
Tampa Fishing, Friday, December 9, 2016, Redfish, Tampa Fishing Report & Charters.

The Naples-Marco Island area has terrific beaches and beach fishing!  The beaches stretch along the Gulf of Mexico for about 10 miles and include Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park, Clam Pass Beach Park, Naples Municipal Beach & Fishing Pier (Naples Pier), Vanderbilt Beach, North Gulfshore Boulevard Beach, and Lowdermilk Beach Park.  Naples beaches are often ranked in the top 5-10 beaches in America!

There are also a number of both small and very large reserves in and nearby Naples-Marco Island.  They include Corkscrew Swamp SanctuaryEverglades National ParkBig Cypress National PreserveFlorida Panther National Wildlife RefugeTen Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge, and Picayune Strand State Forest.

Naples Fishing, Redfish, Friday, November 11, 2016, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Naples Fishing, Redfish, Friday, November 11, 2016, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Like much of southwest Florida, Naples has barrier islands which mean great fishing!  The breadth of the natural ecosystem near Naples is immense and can’t be fully described in this short post.  Marco Island is the most well-known, but Marco Island spills south into the Ten Thousand Islands and unbelievably good fishing!

Naples Fishing, Redfish, Sunday, 12-13-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Naples Fishing, Redfish, Sunday, 12-13-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Other islands include Keywaydin Island, which is the longest unbridged island in southwest Florida and has a lot of natural habitats, and Kice Island and Cape Romano, which are very remote!

We’re just getting started in Naples, but we’re looking forward to reporting on Naples fishing!

If you are a local fishing guide/captain and would like to submit photos and reports, please let us know.  All are welcome.  You can reach us @ FloridaFishingCharterReport@gmail.com.

Florida Fishing Report: Red Tide Status, 2-23-18

Florida Red Tide Status Map, 2-23-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.
Florida Red Tide Status Map, 2-23-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.

Florida Fish & Wildlife Red Tide Status: Friday, February 23, 2018

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Direct From Homeowners.FWC released the Red Tide Status Report this week.

Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission red tide bulletin at 3:15 PM 2/23/2018.

Red Tide Status Report (February 23, 2018)

“A patchy bloom of the Florida red tide organism, Karenia brevis, persists in Southwest Florida.

In Southwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at very low to medium concentrations in five samples collected from or offshore of Lee County, and medium concentrations in one sample collected offshore of Monroe County.

Gulf of Mexico Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin Friday, February 23, 2018. Courtesy Of NOAA National Ocean Service NOAA Satellite and Information Service & NOAA National Weather Service.
Gulf of Mexico Harmful Algal Bloom Bulletin
Friday, February 23, 2018. Courtesy Of NOAA National Ocean Service NOAA Satellite and Information Service & NOAA National Weather Service.

In Northwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at background concentrations in one sample collected from Franklin County.

Additional samples collected throughout Florida over the past week did not contain K. brevis.

Fish kills were reported in Lee County at Bunche Beach and in Pine Island Sound (2/22) and in Monroe County, offshore of Marathon Key and Grassy Key in Florida Bay (2/16, and 2/19-2/21). Respiratory irritation was also reported in Monroe County, offshore of Marathon Key (2/19). Forecasts by the USF-FWC Collaboration for Prediction of Red TidesExternal Websitefor Pinellas to Monroe counties predict northern, alongshore transport of surface waters and southern, onshore transport of subsurface waters over the next three days.”

For more information, please see FWC.

Key for Results

Description Karenia breviscells/liter Possible Effects (K. brevis only)
NOT PRESENT – BACKGROUND background levels of 1,000 cells or less None anticipated
VERY LOW >1,000 to 10,000 Possible respiratory irritation; shellfish harvesting closures >  5,000 cells/L
LOW >10,000 to 100,000 Respiratory irritation, possible fish kills, and bloom chlorophyll probably detected by satellites at upper limits
MEDIUM >100,000 to 1,000,000 Respiratory irritation and probable fish kills
HIGH >1,000,000 As above plus discoloration

 

“The FWRI Red Tide Status Line is now available to callers throughout the state. FWRI updates the recording each Friday by 5 p.m. Red Tide Status Line: 866-300-9399 (toll-free inside Florida only); 727-552-2448 (outside Florida).

Reports are updated on Friday afternoon except during holidays, in which case the report will be released on the closest day. Additional information, if available, is provided on Wednesday afternoon. To receive an e-mail when the current status has been updated, visit our subscription area.

FWC’s Red Tide Action Report

Red tide is a naturally-occurring microscopic alga that has been documented along Florida’s Gulf Coast since the 1840’s and occurs nearly every year. Blooms, or higher-than-normal concentrations, of the Florida red tide alga, Karenia brevis, frequently occur in the Gulf of Mexico. Red tide begins in the Gulf of Mexico 10 to 40 miles offshore and can be transported inshore by winds and currents.

FWC Actions and Partnerships:

  • FWC operates the toll-free fish kill hotline. To report fish kills, contact the FWC Fish Kill Hotline at 800-636-0511 or submit a report online. Reports from this hotline help FWC researchers track and better understand the impact of red tide in Florida.
  • FWC remains available to local agencies and partners in affected areas, including area business and tourism groups in southwest Florida. Any local agency or group that has any questions or concerns can contact Kelly Richmond from the FWC at 727-502-4784.
  • FWC continues to partner with the Florida Department of Health to advise residents and visitors of any potential health impacts. Residents and visitors can contact the DOH’s aquatic toxin experts at 850-245-4250 or contact their local health department for any concern about health safety.
  • FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and Mote Marine Laboratory work together to monitor Karenia brevis. This cooperative effort is designed to help mitigate the adverse impacts of red tide. This joint research program that includes red tide monitoring, research and public outreach and education has resulted in better tools and ongoing monitoring for red tides along the Gulf Coast.
  • In partnership with the FWC, the Collaboration for Prediction of Red Tides (CPR) at the University of South Florida offer a new Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) tracking tool that generates a 3.5-day forecast of the bloom trajectories.
  • To protect public health, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute’s Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) group closely monitors the status of K. brevis on Florida’s coasts, providing technical support to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACSExternal Website), the agency that regulates approved shellfish harvesting areas.
  • Since 2000, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute established a Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program, which is a volunteer program for citizens to help collect water samples from routine collection points and sites reported for suspected harmful algal blooms (HABs).The timely sampling by volunteers allows researchers to provide an early warning of offshore algal blooms and investigate reported events as they occur. The Program needs volunteers to collect samples from all coastal Florida counties. To view more information visit, Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program or use the Volunteer SignUp Form.

Red Tide Resources

Naples Fishing: Snook!

Snook, Monday, February 19, 2018, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Snook, Monday, February 19, 2018, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Naples Fishing Report: Snook.

VacationHomeRental.org. No VRBO Booking Fees. Free To Renters. $99 Annually To HomeOwners.Naples Fishing Report, Monday, February 19, 2018, Florida Fishing Report – Naples: Snook, In Passes On Drifts!  Latest Algal Bloom & Water Quality / Lake Okeechobee Update and Red Tide Report.  We’re mostly focused on Naples fishing the channels, grass flats, passes, oyster bars, mangroves and near shore fishing in Naples, but we also give updates on Naples deep sea fishing.

We’re big advocates of catch and release, particularly for snook, but pretty much for most species.  Only take what you are going to eat, and a lot of fish are better off as sport fish, even if they are in season.  Our motto is let ‘em get bigger and catch ‘em again!

Snook, Friday, August 18, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Snook, Friday, August 18, 2017, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

The Naples-Marco Island area has terrific beaches and beach fishing!  The beaches stretch along the Gulf of Mexico for about 10 miles and include Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park, Clam Pass Beach Park, Naples Municipal Beach & Fishing Pier (Naples Pier), Vanderbilt Beach, North Gulfshore Boulevard Beach, and Lowdermilk Beach Park.  Naples beaches are often ranked in the top 5-10 beaches in America!

There are also a number of both small and very large reserves in and nearby Naples-Marco Island.  They include Corkscrew Swamp SanctuaryEverglades National ParkBig Cypress National PreserveFlorida Panther National Wildlife RefugeTen Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge, and Picayune Strand State Forest.

Naples Fishing, Snook, Friday, September 2, 2016, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Naples Fishing, Snook, Friday, September 2, 2016, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Like much of southwest Florida, Naples has barrier islands which mean great fishing!  The breadth of the natural ecosystem near Naples is immense and can’t be fully described in this short post.  Marco Island is the most well-known, but Marco Island spills south into the Ten Thousand Islands and unbelievably good fishing!

Naples Fishing, Snook & Redfish, Oyster Bars, Thursday, August 23, 2016, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.
Naples Fishing, Snook & Redfish, Oyster Bars, Thursday, August 23, 2016, Naples Fishing Report & Charters.

Other islands include Keywaydin Island, which is the longest unbridged island in southwest Florida and has a lot of natural habitats, and Kice Island and Cape Romano, which are very remote!

SnookCommonDRP.jpg

Image Credit: © Diane Rome Peebles

Snook

“Snook is managed by two regions in Florida: Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. Regulations apply in state and adjacent federal waters. No commercial harvest or sale of snook is permitted.

License Requirements:  Snook permit and recreational fishing license

Florida Regulations:

Atlantic (state and adjacent federal waters, includes Lake Okeechobee and Kissimmee River) Gulf of Mexico, Monroe County, and Everglades National Park (state and adjacent federal waters)
Closed Harvest Season Dec. 15 – Jan. 31; June 1 – Aug. 31 Dec. 1-end of February; May 1-Aug. 31
Size Limit Not less than 28″  total length (TL) or more than 32″ TL Not less than 28″  total length (TL) or more than 33″ TL
Bag Limit 1 per harvester per day; zero captain and crew for hire limit

 Allowable Gear: Hook and line only

Snook Map

Snook Map

Snook is managed by two regions in Florida: Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. Regulations apply in state and adjacent federal waters. No commercial harvest or sale of snook is permitted.

If you have questions about your snook permit, visit the Snook Permit page.

Research and Biology

To learn more about snook biology and research projects conducted by the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, visit their snook page.”

More information at FWC.