Naples Fishing: Blacktip Sharks, July 10!

Naples Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.

Joey, Charlie-Small-Blacktip, 1-9-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Joey, Charlie-Small-Blacktip, 1-9-15, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Naples Fishing Charters, July 10, 2018: Blacktip Shark, Catch & Release

Naples Fishing: Please Click For Rates & To Book A Charter Or Call 239-472-8658.

Naples Fishing Report, Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Florida Fishing Report – Naples: Blacktip Sharks, on cut bait!  Latest Algal Bloom & Water Quality / Lake Okeechobee Update and Red Tide Report.  We’re mostly focused on Naples fishing the channels, grass flats, passes, oyster bars, mangroves and near shore fishing in Naples, but we also give updates on Naples deep sea fishing.

We’re big advocates of catch and release, particularly for snook, but pretty much for most species.  Only take what you are going to eat, and a lot of fish are better off as sport fish, even if they are in season.  Our motto is let ‘em get bigger and catch ‘em again!

Blacktip Shark, 4-15-14, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Blacktip Shark, 4-15-14, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Please see our SanibelCaptivaFort Myers, and Cuban Fishing sites for charter photos from our other captains, additional fishing and shelling reports, and musings on fishing in Cuba one of these days!

“The blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) is a species of requiem shark, and part of the family Carcharhinidae. It is common to coastal tropical and subtropical waters around the world, including brackish habitats. Genetic analyses have revealed substantial variation within this species, with populations from the western Atlantic Ocean isolated and distinct from those in the rest of its range.

Blacktip Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Monday, April 23, 2018.
Blacktip Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Monday, April 23, 2018.

The blacktip shark has a stout, fusiform body with a pointed snout, long gill slits, and no ridge between the dorsal fins. Most individuals have black tips or edges on the pectoral, dorsal, pelvic, and caudal fins. It usually attains a length of 1.5 m (4.9 ft).

Blacktip Shark & Children, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, July 16, 2017.
Blacktip Shark & Children, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, July 16, 2017.

Swift, energetic piscivores, blacktip sharks are known to make spinning leaps out of the water while attacking schools of small fish. Their demeanor has been described as “timid” compared to other large requiem sharks. Both juveniles and adults form groups of varying size. Like other members of its family, the blacktip shark is viviparous; females bear one to 10 pups every other year.

Big Blacktip Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, June 13, 2018.
Big Blacktip Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters & Captiva Island Fishing Charters, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, June 13, 2018.

Young blacktip sharks spend the first months of their lives in shallow nurseries, and grown females return to the nurseries where they were born to give birth themselves. In the absence of males, females are also capable of asexual reproduction.

Blacktip Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, July 3, 2017.
Blacktip Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, July 3, 2017.

Normally wary of humans, blacktip sharks can become aggressive in the presence of food and have been responsible for a number of attacks on people. This species is of importance to both commercial and recreational fisheries across many parts of its range, with its meat, skin, fins, and liver oil used. It has been assessed as Near Threatened by the IUCN, on the basis of its low reproductive rate and high value to fishers.”  Please see more information here.

SharkBlacktipDRP.jpg

Image Credit: © Diane Rome Peebles

“Blacktip Shark: Carcharhinus limbatus

Appearance:

  • Back is dark bluish-gray (juveniles paler) fading to a whitish belly
  • Anal fin lacks black tip (in adults); dorsal fins, pectoral fins, anal fin and caudal fin lower lobe are black-tipped in juveniles (fades with growth)
  • First dorsal fin starts above pectoral fin inner margin
  • Long snout that appears nearly V-shaped from below
  • No inter-dorsal ridge

Similar Species: Spinner shark, C. brevipinna (first dorsal fin starts behind the pectoral fin; anal fin is black-tipped)

Size: Up to 6.5 feet

Blacktip Sharks, Inshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, November 14, 2017.
Blacktip Sharks, Inshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, November 14, 2017.

Habitat:

Coastal to offshore waters. Blacktips often come inshore in large schools, particularly in association with Spanish mackerel. Frequently, the most common shark in clear-water cuts and along beaches in Florida and Bahamas.

Behavior:

One of the most common shark species in Florida coastal waters

Additional Information

State Record:External Website 152 lbs.

Fishing Tips and Facts: Blacktip sharks are sometimes caught by sport fishers off the beach or offshore. They provide a good fight, often leaping out of the water.”

Recreational Regulations here.  Please see source & more information here.

Captiva Fishing, Blacktip Shark 4-2-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Captiva Fishing, Blacktip Shark 4-2-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658

The Naples-Marco Island area has terrific beaches and beach fishing!  The beaches stretch along the Gulf of Mexico for about 10 miles and include Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park, Clam Pass Beach Park, Naples Municipal Beach & Fishing Pier (Naples Pier), Vanderbilt Beach, North Gulfshore Boulevard Beach, and Lowdermilk Beach Park.  Naples beaches are often ranked in the top 5-10 beaches in America!

There are also a number of both small and very large reserves in and nearby Naples-Marco Island.  They include Corkscrew Swamp SanctuaryEverglades National ParkBig Cypress National PreserveFlorida Panther National Wildlife RefugeTen Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge, and Picayune Strand State Forest.

Blacktip Shark, 4-18-14, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.
Blacktip Shark, 4-18-14, Naples Fishing Report & Charters ~ #Naples.

Like much of southwest Florida, Naples has barrier islands which mean great fishing!  The breadth of the natural ecosystem near Naples is immense and can’t be fully described in this short post.  Marco Island is the most well-known, but Marco Island spills south into the Ten Thousand Islands and unbelievably good fishing!

Blacktip Shark, 7-20-14, Boca Grande Fishing Report & Charters, #BocaGrande.
Blacktip Shark, 7-20-14, Boca Grande Fishing Report & Charters, #BocaGrande.

Other islands include Keywaydin Island, which is the longest unbridged island in southwest Florida and has a lot of natural habitats, and Kice Island and Cape Romano, which are very remote!

Florida Fishing Report: Red Tide Status, 7-6-18

  • Florida Red Tide Status Map, 7-6-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.
    Florida Red Tide Status Map, 7-6-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.

    Florida Fish & Wildlife Red Tide Status: Friday, July 6, 2018

    FWC released the Red Tide Status Report this week.

    Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission red tide bulletin at 3:45 PM 7/6/2018.

    Red Tide Status Report (July 6, 2018)

    A patchy bloom of the Florida red tide organism, Karenia brevis, persists in Southwest Florida.

    In Southwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at background to high concentrations in 24 samples collected from or offshore of Sarasota County, low to high concentrations in seven samples collected from or offshore of Charlotte County, background to high concentrations in 32 samples collected from or offshore of Lee County, and background to medium concentrations in 10 samples collected from or offshore of Collier County.

    Additional samples collected throughout Florida over the past week did not contain K. brevis.

    Over the past week, fish kills were reported in Southwest Florida in Sarasota County (Casey Key, Manasota Beach, Nokomis Beach, Venice Beach, Venice North Jetty), in Charlotte County (Boca Grande Beach, Don Pedro State Park, Gasparilla Pass, Lemon Bay, Little Gasparilla Beach, Punta Gorda Beach, Red Fish Cove), in and offshore of Lee County (Boca Grande Pass, Gasparilla Island, Captiva Beach, San Carlos Bay, Sanibel Island), and in Collier County (South Marco Beach).

    Southwest Florida Red Tide Status Map, 7-6-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.
    Southwest Florida Red Tide Status Map, 7-6-18, Courtesy Of FWC, Florida Red Tide Report.

    Respiratory irritation was reported over the past week in Sarasota County (6/29 and 7/3 at Lido Key; 6/28-7/1 and 7/3-7/6 at Manasota Beach; 6/29-7/4 and 7/6 at Nokomis; 6/29-7/1 and 7/3-7/5 at Venice Beach; 6/29-7/4 and 7/6 at Venice North Jetty), and Lee County (6/28-6/29 at Captiva; 6/28-6/29 and 7/2 at Gasparilla Island Range Lighthouse; 6/29-7/2 at Gasparilla Island State Park).

    Forecasts by the USF-FWC Collaboration for Prediction of Red TidesExternal Website for Pinellas to northern Monroe counties predict net northern, alongshore movement of surface waters, and southern, onshore transport of subsurface waters over the next three days.

    For more information, please see FWC.

    Key for Results

    Description Karenia breviscells/liter Possible Effects (K. brevis only)
    NOT PRESENT – BACKGROUND background levels of 1,000 cells or less None anticipated
    VERY LOW >1,000 to 10,000 Possible respiratory irritation; shellfish harvesting closures >  5,000 cells/L
    LOW >10,000 to 100,000 Respiratory irritation, possible fish kills, and bloom chlorophyll probably detected by satellites at upper limits
    MEDIUM >100,000 to 1,000,000 Respiratory irritation and probable fish kills
    HIGH >1,000,000 As above plus discoloration

     

    “The FWRI Red Tide Status Line is now available to callers throughout the state. FWRI updates the recording each Friday by 5 p.m. Red Tide Status Line: 866-300-9399 (toll-free inside Florida only); 727-552-2448 (outside Florida).

    Reports are updated on Friday afternoon except during holidays, in which case the report will be released on the closest day. Additional information, if available, is provided on Wednesday afternoon. To receive an e-mail when the current status has been updated, visit our subscription area.

    FWC’s Red Tide Action Report

    Red tide is a naturally-occurring microscopic alga that has been documented along Florida’s Gulf Coast since the 1840’s and occurs nearly every year. Blooms, or higher-than-normal concentrations, of the Florida red tide alga, Karenia brevis, frequently occur in the Gulf of Mexico. Red tide begins in the Gulf of Mexico 10 to 40 miles offshore and can be transported inshore by winds and currents.

    FWC Actions and Partnerships:

    • FWC operates the toll-free fish kill hotline. To report fish kills, contact the FWC Fish Kill Hotline at 800-636-0511 or submit a report online. Reports from this hotline help FWC researchers track and better understand the impact of red tide in Florida.
    • FWC remains available to local agencies and partners in affected areas, including area business and tourism groups in southwest Florida. Any local agency or group that has any questions or concerns can contact Kelly Richmond from the FWC at 727-502-4784.
    • FWC continues to partner with the Florida Department of Health to advise residents and visitors of any potential health impacts. Residents and visitors can contact the DOH’s aquatic toxin experts at 850-245-4250 or contact their local health department for any concern about health safety.
    • FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute and Mote Marine Laboratory work together to monitor Karenia brevis. This cooperative effort is designed to help mitigate the adverse impacts of red tide. This joint research program that includes red tide monitoring, research and public outreach and education has resulted in better tools and ongoing monitoring for red tides along the Gulf Coast.
    • In partnership with the FWC, the Collaboration for Prediction of Red Tides (CPR) at the University of South Florida offer a new Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) tracking tool that generates a 3.5-day forecast of the bloom trajectories.
    • To protect public health, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute’s Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) group closely monitors the status of K. brevis on Florida’s coasts, providing technical support to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACSExternal Website), the agency that regulates approved shellfish harvesting areas.
    • Since 2000, FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute established a Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program, which is a volunteer program for citizens to help collect water samples from routine collection points and sites reported for suspected harmful algal blooms (HABs).The timely sampling by volunteers allows researchers to provide an early warning of offshore algal blooms and investigate reported events as they occur. The Program needs volunteers to collect samples from all coastal Florida counties. To view more information visit, Red Tide Offshore Monitoring Program or use the Volunteer SignUp Form.

    Red Tide Resources

Florida Fishing Charters